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Can Our Relationships Be Reconceptualized? Librarians, Information Literacy, and Doctoral Learners

Peter Macauley and Rosemary Green
Journal of Education for Library and Information Science
Vol. 50, No. 2 (Spring 2009), pp. 68-78
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40732565
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Can Our Relationships Be Reconceptualized? Librarians, Information Literacy, and Doctoral Learners
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Abstract

This article stems from two separate, yet related, studies that examined aspects of the doctoral experience across multiple disciplines and queried the construct of information literacy, contextualized by doctoral pedagogies. The first study used mixed-methods research into information literacy and scholarly communication within the processes of Australian doctoral supervision and research. The second study was a qualitative investigation of the literature review process, taken from the perspectives of American and Australian doctoral candidates, doctoral advisors and supervisors, and librarians. We conclude that candidates typically arrive at the doctoral environment as adult learners, with well developed experiential and professional skills, knowledge, and attributes. The studies share the finding that doctoral advisors, supervisors, and librarians should not assume that all doctoral students require information literacy interventions. We recommend a negotiated approach of engaging in careful dialogue with students, faculty, and colleagues regarding learners' and researchers' profiles and information needs.

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