Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

L'ERITREA IN MOSTRA. FERDINANDO MARTINI E LE ESPOSIZIONI COLONIALI, 1903-1906

Massimo Zaccaria
Africa: Rivista trimestrale di studi e documentazione dell'Istituto italiano per l'Africa e l'Oriente
Anno 57, No. 4 (Dicembre 2002), pp. 512-545
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40761654
Page Count: 34
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
L'ERITREA IN MOSTRA. FERDINANDO MARTINI E LE ESPOSIZIONI COLONIALI, 1903-1906
Preview not available

Abstract

After the defeat of Adua, Italian public opinion clearly expressed its opposition to colonial expansion pointing out that it would have been better to invest money in Italy, trying to solve the many problems afflicting the country instead of wasting it in Africa. In order to mitigate this stance Ferdinando Martini, the first Civil Governor of Eritrea, promoted a reconciliation policy aiming at favouring a re-approach between the country with its colony. The message that Martini tried to get through was simple: Eritrea could evolve to a great extent and became profitable for Italy if properly administered. This idea was the core of most of Martini's writings and speeches. Also, to reach a wider public, Martini resorted to exhibitions, organising four in the period ranging from 1903 to 1906. This article deals with those exhibitions, showing how Martini and his administration invested resources and hopes in their setting up. The article also maintains that the extent of this involvement provides evidence of the existence of a real "exhibition policy" implemented by Martini over the period of his mandate. Après la défaite de Adua, l'opinion publique italienne exprima son opposition à l'expansion coloniale, soulignant qu'il aurait été mieux d'investir de l'argent en Italie pour tâcher de résoudre les nombreux problèmes qui affligeaient le pays, au lieu de le gaspiller en Afrique. Pour assouplir cette position, Ferdinando Martino, le premier gouverneur de l'Erythrée, lança une politique de réconciliation qui visait à favoriser un rapprochement entre le Pays et sa colonie. Le message que Martini cherchait à faire passer était très simple: l'Erythrée aurait pu se développer et devenir rentable pour l'Italie si elle était correctement administrée. Cette idée était le centre de la plus part de ses écrits et de ses discours. Pour rejoindre un public plus large, Martini fit recours à des expositions, en nombre de quatre dans la période entre 1903 et 1906. Le sujet de cet article sont ces expositions qui montrent, dans leur préparation, comment Martini et son administration investissaient les ressources et les espoirs. Cet article veut montrer aussi que l'ampleur de ces activitées témoigne l'existence d'une sorte de « politique des expositions » réalisée par Martini pendant son mandat.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[512]
    [512]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
513
    513
  • Thumbnail: Page 
514
    514
  • Thumbnail: Page 
515
    515
  • Thumbnail: Page 
516
    516
  • Thumbnail: Page 
517
    517
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
  • Thumbnail: Page 
528
    528
  • Thumbnail: Page 
529
    529
  • Thumbnail: Page 
530
    530
  • Thumbnail: Page 
531
    531
  • Thumbnail: Page 
532
    532
  • Thumbnail: Page 
533
    533
  • Thumbnail: Page 
534
    534
  • Thumbnail: Page 
535
    535
  • Thumbnail: Page 
536
    536
  • Thumbnail: Page 
537
    537
  • Thumbnail: Page 
538
    538
  • Thumbnail: Page 
539
    539
  • Thumbnail: Page 
540
    540
  • Thumbnail: Page 
541
    541
  • Thumbnail: Page 
542
    542
  • Thumbnail: Page 
543
    543
  • Thumbnail: Page 
544
    544
  • Thumbnail: Page 
545
    545