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Home Ranges of Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers in Coastal South Carolina

Robert G. Hooper, Lawrence J. Niles, Richard F. Harlow and Gene W. Wood
The Auk
Vol. 99, No. 4 (Oct., 1982), pp. 675-682
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4086172
Page Count: 8
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Home Ranges of Red-Cockaded Woodpeckers in Coastal South Carolina
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Abstract

Total observed ranges of 24 groups of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) varied from 34 to 225 ha and averaged 86.9 ha. Groups defended portions of these ranges from adjacent groups year-round. Home ranges were derived from total observed ranges by subtracting extraterritorial areas and areas receiving limited use. The percentage of year-round home-range boundaries determined by intergroup conflicts varied from 0% to 54% and averaged 23.6%. Year-round home ranges averaged 70.3 ha and varied from 30 to 195 ha. The portion of year-round home ranges used in all sampling periods varied from 15% to 65% and averaged 30.5%. The amount of potential foraging habitat per group for all groups within 2,000 m of a study group's colony, a measure of population density relative to available habitat, accounted for 70% of the variation in size of year-round home ranges (P <0.0001). Various measures of group size and habitat quality were weakly related to size of year-round home ranges. Measures of group size and population density together accounted for 80% of the variation in size of year-round home ranges.

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