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Is There Enough Science for Conservation Action?

Ramanan U. Shaanker and Kotiganahalli N. Ganeshaiah
Biotropica
Vol. 42, No. 5 (September 2010), pp. 563-565
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40863788
Page Count: 3
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Is There Enough Science for Conservation Action?
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Abstract

We argue that there is not enough science to appropriately support many of the conservation measures currently being proposed, and hence, we cannot be sure of the objectivity of the conservation actions being implemented. The objectivity claimed to be underlying conservation actions is more assumed than real. We also suggest that the approach to conservation is driven more by moral commitments than by tested concepts, and it is further biased by our anthropocentric evaluation of ecological processes and their outcomes. Conservation science is a young subject, which needs to be nourished while it continues to feed on its roots-ecology and evolutionary biology.

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