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Linguistic Theory in the Italian Renaissance

Robert A. Hall, Jr.
Language
Vol. 12, No. 2 (Apr., 1936 - Jun., 1938), pp. 96-107
DOI: 10.2307/408752
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/408752
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Linguistic Theory in the Italian Renaissance
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Abstract

The work of Renaissance scholars on language, especially in Italy, deserves more attention than it has usually received. Certain sixteenth-century writers (Tolomei, Castelvetro, Scaliger, and others) anticipated nineteenth-century developments: firstly, in regarding language as a social phenomenon; secondly, in recognizing change as an essential element of linguistic history; and thirdly, in a more scientific approach, particularly in regard to phonetic law.

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