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A Critical Review of the Transoceanic Migration of the Blackpoll Warbler

Bertram G. Murray, Jr.
The Auk
Vol. 106, No. 1 (Jan., 1989), pp. 8-17
DOI: 10.2307/4087751
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4087751
Page Count: 10
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A Critical Review of the Transoceanic Migration of the Blackpoll Warbler
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Abstract

Blackpoll Warblers (Dendroica striata) may reach their winter range in South America by migrating directly over the Atlantic Ocean from the northeastern United States (Drury and Keith 1962, Nisbet et al. 1963) and the Maritime Provinces (Richardson 1972, 1980), through the southeastern United States (Cooke 1904, 1915; Murray 1965, 1966a), or through both regions. Evidence obtained since the 1960s has been accepted as supporting the first of these hypotheses. My purpose was to provide a critical review of the evidence for and against these conflicting views. I examined the geographic distribution and the time of occurrence of Blackpoll Warblers during migration from the northern United States to the Caribbean islands, differences in mean body mass of samples in time and place from the northeastern United States, Bermuda, and Florida, and radar and visual evidence from over the sea. There is no unequivocal evidence that any Blackpoll Warblers migrate over the sea directly from New England to South America, and all evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that Blackpoll Warblers migrate to South America through the southeastern United States.

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