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Die gesellschaftliche Rationalisierung der Ökonomie: Vom garantierten Mindesteinkommen als konstitutionellem Anrecht

Harry F. Dahms
Soziale Welt
43. Jahrg., H. 2 (1992), pp. 141-167
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40877707
Page Count: 27
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Die gesellschaftliche Rationalisierung der Ökonomie: Vom garantierten Mindesteinkommen als konstitutionellem Anrecht
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Abstract

The concept of the guaranteed minimum income belongs to a social-theoretical tradition that may be followed from Hegel over Heimann to contemporary social thinkers like Habermas. It is the cornerstone of an expansive theory of social policy expressive of the changes in the relationship between economy and society over the long-term: the societal rationalization of the economy. By starting with Hegel's remarks on poverty in the Philosophy of Right, the stage is set to examine the constitutional character of the guaranteed minimum income. Although Heimann did not address the idea of the guaranteed minimum income either, his Social Theory of Capitalism (1929) provides the frame of reference for the project of a contemporary theory of social policy that fosters such an idea. In the theories of such authors under discussion as Dahrendorf and Offe, a theory of social policy that treats the guaranteed minimum income as a constitutional entitlement takes shape. The article concludes with an attempt at introducing the concept of a guaranteed minimum income as one step in a process of the societal rationalization of the economy.

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