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Globalisierung als Herrschaft. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit dem makrosoziologischen Neoinstitutionalismus von Meyer et al

Monika Schäfer
Soziale Welt
51. Jahrg., H. 3 (2000), pp. 355-375
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40878321
Page Count: 21
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Globalisierung als Herrschaft. Eine Auseinandersetzung mit dem makrosoziologischen Neoinstitutionalismus von Meyer et al
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Abstract

Globalization, understood as the world-wide spread of western institutions and particularly of the modern form of organisation, is the focus of the macro-sociological institutional theory developed at Stanford University by John W. Meyer et al. Having become popular in organisational studies in the 1980s, this approach concentrates on the increasing isomorphism in both the structure of social practices and the construction of social entities in accordance with "western cultural accounts". Researchers point out the amazing homogeneity in models available for the construction and regulation of social life. Social patterns that differ from dominant western institutions do not gain significance on world level. The article argues that although the approach by Meyer et al. is reasonably able to analyse homogenization, it lacks the theoretical means to explain asymmetry, i.e. the trend towards inequality on a world-wide level. This asymmetry in the structure of "world society" is the focus of Immanuel Wallerstein's world-system theory. The author suggests that a synthesis of these two macro-sociological theories will allow to define globalization as domination, understood as a combination of both institutional homogenization and structural asymmetry. From an emancipatory perspective, the author suggests to discuss ways to induce some global dynamics of de-institutionalization.

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