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LA NOVEDAD QUE EN EL CONCEPTO DE NATURALEZA INTRODUCE EL CRISTIANISMO

R. PANIKER
Tijdschrift voor Philosophie
13de Jaarg., Nr. 2 (JUNI 1951), pp. 236-262
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40879388
Page Count: 27
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
LA NOVEDAD QUE EN EL CONCEPTO DE NATURALEZA INTRODUCE EL CRISTIANISMO
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Abstract

The first dogma of Christianism is the creation of all things by God and the second one is the actual reality of this created world which is neither « God » nor « nothing », but precisely a real nature. In this concept is included the enormous tension and polarity of created things. The new philosophical enrichment brought forth by Christianism is the « creatureness » of Nature. The beings are instruments of God in their nature, but this nature is not a simple word. It has real consistency, although the natura naturata is not God, the natura naturans. If the greek horizon is that of nothingness — nihility — on one hand and that of movility on the other, the Christian outlook springs from the contingency of things, the otherness, — alienity — of things in regard to God. God is, creature neither is nor not-is, but is-not-yet, becomes, tends to, longs for, is in potency. The created beings are, so far as they are coming-back to their Principle, to God. The two poles of this tension were unequally developed during the progress of Christianity and the different stress on one point or the other makes the diversity of doctrines inside Scholasticism. Further on, nature as principle of the movement of a being must have an individual character, but as an essential principle of beings would have to have a universal one. This duality was developed by nominalists and realists seeking for a solution which was found eihter in the Augustinian direction of thought or in the Thomistic line. But it is shown that the diversity of these two systems is not a contradiction but only two differentpoints of avantage from which the problem is focused. Thomism is based on Augustinism. Nature is the very real instrument of God without losing its own reality. And only by the introduction of the idea of creation is nature possible as a real thing dependant of God and vestige of Him, and at the same time real in itself and not God.

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