Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Flight Morphology, Energetic Condition, and the Stopover Biology of Migrating Thrushes

Wang Yong and Frank R. Moore
The Auk
Vol. 111, No. 3 (Jul., 1994), pp. 683-692
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4088471
Page Count: 10
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Flight Morphology, Energetic Condition, and the Stopover Biology of Migrating Thrushes
Preview not available

Abstract

Flight morphology affects aerodynamic performance and the energetic demand for migration. We investigated the relationship between flight morphology and energetic condition of Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina), Veery (Catharus fuscescens), Swainson's Thrush (C. ustulatus), and Gray-cheeked Thrush (C. minimus) during migration and the consequences for stopover behavior following spring trans-Gulf passage. Differences in morphological variables were found among Catharus thrushes, and between Wood Thrush and Catharus thrushes. Species with longer migratory distances have longer, more pointed wings and higher aspect ratios. The relatively larger wing area and lower body mass of Gray-cheeked Thrush and Veery result in lower wing loadings. Whereas wing size increased with increasing lean body mass in all species, the interrelations of wing span and wing area with lean body mass were allometrical (i.e. deviated from expected isometric relationship). Larger individuals in each species have disproportionately large wings. Wing size was negatively related to amount of stored fat, which indicated that larger individuals within each species have smaller fat stores remaining after trans-Gulf migration. Species or individuals with relatively long, pointed wings are more efficient migrants, and their energetic demand per unit distance travelled is lower. The consequences vis-a-vis stopover biology are considered.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
683
    683
  • Thumbnail: Page 
684
    684
  • Thumbnail: Page 
685
    685
  • Thumbnail: Page 
686
    686
  • Thumbnail: Page 
687
    687
  • Thumbnail: Page 
688
    688
  • Thumbnail: Page 
689
    689
  • Thumbnail: Page 
690
    690
  • Thumbnail: Page 
691
    691
  • Thumbnail: Page 
692
    692