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EIGENLIJKE EXISTENTIE EN POLITIEKE WERELD

Klaus Held
Tijdschrift voor Filosofie
55ste Jaarg., Nr. 4 (DECEMBER 1993), pp. 634-656
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40886931
Page Count: 23
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EIGENLIJKE EXISTENTIE EN POLITIEKE WERELD
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Abstract

Little attention has been paid to the dimension of the political world in the phenomenological project of Husserl and Heidegger. However, this is not due to phenomenology as such, as has been proven by the discovery of the political occurring in the work of Hannah Arendt. The author therefore takes the phenomenological ideal of openness to the world in authentic existence as his starting point in an attempt to provide a systematic phenomenological determination of the political world. A preparatory first part elucidates the phenomenological significance of the distinction between the inauthentic existence of everyday life and authentic existence. He argues that it is not a volitional intellectual act but a fundamental mood which makes possible the transition to authentic openness for the world. A second part develops this thesis by analysing the rise of divergence of opinion concerning possible action as a 'public matter', which can not be resolved by expertise. This divergence serves as a focus in which the life-world comes to the fore as the domain of possibility for action, which asks for the reflective power of judgment in the Kantian sense. The third part characterises the political world as in between ethos and kairos. The political is thus conditioned by the temporal finitude of human existence between past and future. Part four briefly sketches the totalitarian seduction as a revolt against this finitude.

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