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Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation among the Subspecies of Sarus Crane (Grus antigone)

Timothy C. Wood and Carey Krajewski
The Auk
Vol. 113, No. 3 (Jul., 1996), pp. 655-663
DOI: 10.2307/4088986
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4088986
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation among the Subspecies of Sarus Crane (Grus antigone)
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Abstract

We examined DNA sequence variation in an 1,831 base-pair segment of the mitochondrial DNA genome from representatives of the three subspecies of Sarus Crane (Grus antigone). The sequences include the entire cytochrome-b, tRNA Thr, ${\rm tRNA}^{{\rm Pro}}$, and ND6 genes, as well as three short intergenic spacer regions. Nine distinct haplotypes were identified in a sample of nine individuals, three each from the Indian (G. a. antigone), Burmese (G. a. sharpei), and Australian (G. a. gillae) subspecies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that although Sarus Crane haplotypes form a monophyletic assemblage relative to Brolga (G. rubicunda) and White-naped Crane (G. vipio) outgroups, they cannot be resolved onto a dichotomously branching tree. A minimum-length network for the Sarus Crane haplotypes reveals at least one instance of direct ancestry and one hard polytomy, but shows no phylogeographic partitioning of haplotypes among subspecies. Net sequence divergence among subspecies is not significantly different from zero. Estimated sequence divergence times, neutral coalescent times, and data on the Quaternary geology of Australasia suggest that Sarus Cranes colonized Australia during the late Pleistocene.

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