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DE FAMILIE DER WETENSCHAPPEN. VAN EEN WITTGENSTEINIAANSE NAAR EEN PROCEDURELE ANALYSE VAN HET DEMARCATIEPROBLEEM

Koen Vermeir
Tijdschrift voor Filosofie
71ste Jaarg., Nr. 1 (EERSTE KWARTAAL 2009), pp. 119-145
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40890434
Page Count: 27
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
DE FAMILIE DER WETENSCHAPPEN. VAN EEN WITTGENSTEINIAANSE NAAR EEN PROCEDURELE ANALYSE VAN HET DEMARCATIEPROBLEEM
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Abstract

Research into the demarcation problem has come to a dead end for some years already. In this text, I reformulate the problem in such a way that a renewed discussion of the problem becomes possible. In contrast to the heritage of the logical positivists, who stressed language and theory, I argue that it is more fruitful to regard science as a practice. Consequently, a Wittgensteinian analysis seems to be a more appropriate method, and I discuss the advantages and disadvantages of such an approach. This, however, does not bring us far enough, and it turns out to be necessary to reformulate the demarcation problem as a concrete problem: "Is this science?" Subsequently, I formulate a number of conditions that constrain possible solutions to the demarcation problem. Finally, inspired by a number of court cases in which demarcations have been executed in practice, I suggest that a procedural approach is the appropriate way for analysing the demarcation problem.

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