Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Phylogeny and Biogeography of the Amazona ochrocephala (Aves: Psittacidae) Complex

Jessica R. Eberhard and Eldredge Bermingham
The Auk
Vol. 121, No. 2 (Apr., 2004), pp. 318-332
DOI: 10.2307/4090396
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4090396
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Phylogeny and Biogeography of the Amazona ochrocephala (Aves: Psittacidae) Complex
Preview not available

Abstract

We present a phylogenetic analysis of relationships among members of the Amazona ochrocephala species complex of parrots, a broadly distributed group in Middle and South America that has been a "taxonomic headache." Mitochondrial DNA sequence data are used to infer phylogenetic relationships among most of the named subspecies in the complex. Sequence-based phylogenies show that Middle American subspecies included in the analysis are reciprocally monophyletic, but subspecies described for South America do not reflect patterns of genetic variation. Samples from the lower Amazon cluster with samples collected in western Amazonia-not with samples from Colombia and Venezuela, as was predicted by subspecies classification. All subspecies of the complex are more closely related to one another than to other Amazona species, and division of the complex into three species (A. ochrocephala, A. auropalliata, and A. oratrix) is not supported by our data. Divergence-date estimates suggest that these parrots arrived in Middle America after the Panama land-bridge formed, and then expanded and diversified rapidly. As in Middle America, diversification of the group in South America occurred during the Pleistocene, possibly driven by changes in distribution of forest habitat. /// Presentamos un análisis de las relaciones filogenéticas entre miembros del complejo de loros Amazona ochrocephala, un grupo ampliamente distribuido en Mesoamérica y Suramérica, y que ha sido un "dolor de cabeza taxonómico." Utilizamos secuencias de ADN mitocondrial para reconstruir la relaciones filogenéticas entre la mayoría de las subespecies nombradas del complejo. Las filogenias basadas en estas secuencias muestran que las subespecies mesoamericanas incluidas en el análisis son recíprocamente monofiléticas, pero las subespecies descritas para Suramérica no reflejan patrones de variación genética. Muestras de la baja Amazonía se agrupan con muestras de la Amazonía occidental, en vez de agruparse con las muestras de Colombia y Venezuela, como se esperaba con base en la clasificación actual de subespecies. Todas las subespecies del complejo están estrechamente relacionadas entre sí, separadas por distancias menores que las distancias entre miembros del complejo y otras especies de Amazona, y la división del complejo en tres especies (A. ochrocephala, A. auropalliata, y A. oratrix) no es apoyada por nuestros datos. Las fechas de divergencia estimadas con los datos moleculares sugieren que estos loros llegaron a Mesoamérica después de la formación del istmo de Panamá y luego expandieron su distribución y se diversificaron rápidamente. Como en Mesoamérica, la diversificación del grupo en Suramérica occurió durante el Pleistoceno, posiblemente como resultado de cambios en la distribución de hábitats forestales.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320
  • Thumbnail: Page 
321
    321
  • Thumbnail: Page 
322
    322
  • Thumbnail: Page 
323
    323
  • Thumbnail: Page 
324
    324
  • Thumbnail: Page 
325
    325
  • Thumbnail: Page 
326
    326
  • Thumbnail: Page 
327
    327
  • Thumbnail: Page 
328
    328
  • Thumbnail: Page 
329
    329
  • Thumbnail: Page 
330
    330
  • Thumbnail: Page 
331
    331
  • Thumbnail: Page 
332
    332