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DISTRIBUTION OF PALEO-INDIAN PROJECTILE POINTS AND TOOLS FROM WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGIONAL DIFFERENCES

Stanley W. Lantz
Archaeology of Eastern North America
Vol. 12, Special Volume Commemorating the 50th Anniversary of the Eastern States Archeological Federation: "New Experiments upon the Record of Eastern Palaeo-Indian Cultures" (Fall 1984), pp. 210-230
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40914240
Page Count: 21
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DISTRIBUTION OF PALEO-INDIAN PROJECTILE POINTS AND TOOLS FROM WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR REGIONAL DIFFERENCES
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Abstract

An understanding of the selection and utilization of land features by Paleo-Indians and their activities cannot be attained without a quantitative data base. The current status of an ongoing survey of Paleo-Indian sites in 23 counties of western Pennsylvania encompassing the drainage of the Upper Ohio Valley is here presented. Three hundred sixty-five Paleo-Indian artifact finds from 210 sites were plotted on maps to establish their relationship to geological land features, drainages, and regions. The emphasis is on site location with respect to such parameters as Pleistocene lakes, bays, springs, and glacial land features. Of particular interest, is the congruence of site elevations. The data's implications for possible site function, migration patterns, and especially regional differences are discussed at a more general level. Lithic raw material sources are dealt with by a visual comparison with the artifacts themselves or from prerecorded information and not by scientific analysis. Therefore, the conclusions will be open for debate. Point typologies are briefly and generally based on various colleagues' identifications. A hypothesis is presented as a possible explanation of the concentrated utilization by Paleo-Indians of lowland terraces on the glaciated regions of the Appalachian Plateau.

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