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COASTAL BIOGEOGRAPHY AND HUMAN SUBSISTENCE: EXAMPLES FROM THE WEST INDIES

Dave D. Davis
Archaeology of Eastern North America
Vol. 16 (Fall 1988), pp. 177-185
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40914300
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
COASTAL BIOGEOGRAPHY AND HUMAN SUBSISTENCE: EXAMPLES FROM THE WEST INDIES
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Abstract

Biogeographic theory offers a variety of models that can be usefully applied to archeological investigation of subsistence change in coastal habitats. The smaller West Indian islands provide fertile testing grounds for such models. Recent research has focused upon colonization processes, population growth, and subsistence change. These efforts, reviewed with reference to broader biogeographic theory, point to processes of subsistence change that may also be characteristic of coastal ecosystems elsewhere.

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