If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

ALGONQUIAN ORIGINS: A PROBLEM IN ARCHEOLOGICAL—LINGUISTIC CORRELATION

Stuart J. Fiedel
Archaeology of Eastern North America
Vol. 15 (Fall 1987), pp. 1-11
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40914351
Page Count: 11
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
ALGONQUIAN ORIGINS: A PROBLEM IN ARCHEOLOGICAL—LINGUISTIC CORRELATION
Preview not available

Abstract

The now-prevalent assumption of cultural continuity in the Northeast, from Paleo-Indian times until European contact, is incompatible with linguistic reconstructions of Algonquian prehistory, which suggest relatively recent (post-1000 B.C.) dispersal from a northern homeland. The reconstructed vocabulary of Proto-Algonquian suggests that the ancestral population was familiar with items such as smoking pipes, bows and arrows, earthworks, and ceramic pots, which first appear in the archeological record in the Early or Middle Woodland periods. The spread of Point Peninsula and related ceramic wares ca. 200 B.C.-A. D. 700 is a plausible archeological manifestation of Proto-Algonquian expansion.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11