Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

LATEST EARLY TO EARLY MIDDLE DEVONIAN TRILOBITES FROM THE ERBENOCHILE BED, JBEL ISSOUMOUR, SOUTHEASTERN MOROCCO

BRIAN D. E. CHATTERTON and STACEY GIBB
Journal of Paleontology
Vol. 84, No. 6 (NOVEMBER 2010), pp. 1188-1205
Published by: Paleontological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40925991
Page Count: 18
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($12.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
LATEST EARLY TO EARLY MIDDLE DEVONIAN TRILOBITES FROM THE ERBENOCHILE BED, JBEL ISSOUMOUR, SOUTHEASTERN MOROCCO
Preview not available

Abstract

A bed on Jbel Issoumour, near Alnif in southeastern Morocco, contains numerous complete trilobites. The bed is located stratigraphically at the base of the El Otfal Formation, immediately above a cliff-forming resistant unit known to local trilobite miners as the 'grand calcaire', and is latest Emsian or early Eifelian in age. The fauna exhibits an alpha trilobite diversity of at least eight species, including Erbenochile issoumourensis n. sp., Acanthopyge (Lobopyge) bassei n. sp., and Walliserops lindoei n. sp. The absence of lateral palpebrai extensions in E. issoumourensis but their presence in the type species of Erbenochile, E. erbeni, when considered with other differences in the exceptionally large eyes of both species, supports the hypothesis that these palpebrai structures functioned as eyeshades in E. erbeni but not in E. issoumourensis. Walliserops lindoei has a short, stout haft at the base of the trident anterior cephalic projection, which is the most characteristic feature of Walliserops. This projection in Walliserops primarily functioned as a deterrent to predators.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1188
    1188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1189
    1189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1190
    1190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1191
    1191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1192
    1192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1193
    1193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1194
    1194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1195
    1195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1196
    1196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1197
    1197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1198
    1198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1199
    1199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1200
    1200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1201
    1201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1202
    1202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1203
    1203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1204
    1204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1205
    1205