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Morphological and biological characterization of cell line developed from bovine Echinococcus granulosus

Claudia I. Echeverría, Dora M. Isolabella, Elio A. Prieto Gonzalez, Araceli Leonardelli, Laura Prada, Alina Perrone and Alicia G. Fuchs
In Vitro Cellular & Developmental Biology. Animal
Vol. 46, No. 9 (October 2010), pp. 781-792
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40928184
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Morphological and biological characterization of cell line developed from bovine Echinococcus granulosus
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Abstract

The taeniid tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus is the causative agent of echinococcal disease, a major zoonosis with worldwide distribution. Several efforts to establish an in vitro model of E. granulosus have been undertaken; however, many of them have been designed for Echinococcus multilocularis. In the present study, we have described and characterized a stable cell line obtained from E. granulosus bovine protoscoleces maintained 3 yr in vitro. Growth characterization, morphology by light, fluorescent and electronic microscopy, and karyotyping were carried out. Cell culture origin was confirmed by immunofluorescent detection of AgB4 antigen and by PCR for the mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase subunit 1 (DCO1) gene. Cells seeded in agarose biphasic culture resembled a cystic structure, similar to the one formed in secondary hosts. This cell line could be a useful tool to research equinococcal behavior, allowing additional physiological and pharmacological studies, such as the effect of growth factors, nutrients, and antiparasitic drugs on cell viability and growth and on cyst formation.

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