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Chelicerate Arthropods, including the Oldest Phalangiotarbid Arachnid, from the Early Devonian (Siegenian) of the Rhenish Massif, Germany

Markus Poschmann, Lyall I. Anderson and Jason A. Dunlop
Journal of Paleontology
Vol. 79, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 110-124
Published by: Paleontological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4094964
Page Count: 15
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Chelicerate Arthropods, including the Oldest Phalangiotarbid Arachnid, from the Early Devonian (Siegenian) of the Rhenish Massif, Germany
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Abstract

A relatively diverse chelicerate fauna has been detected in Early Devonian, Siegenian strata of the Westerwald area, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. The arachnids, comprising trigonotarbids and the oldest phalangiotarbids, are described and figured here along with the chasmataspidids. To accomodate the phalangiotarbid a new genus and species in the family Architarbidae, Devonotarbus hombachensis, is raised. Devonotarbus n. gen. is characterized by an approximately straight posterior carapace margin, abbreviated and undivided anterior tergites, a large sixth tergite, and fused posterior tergites. The chasmataspidid closely resembles Diploaspis casteri from the Emsian assemblage of Alken an der Mosel, but is readily discernible as a new species, D. muelleri, by a strong tuberculation of its dorsal integument. With only fragmentary opisthosomal remains available, the trigonotarbids cannot be placed in known taxa with any certainty at this time.

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