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The Lower and Middle Palaeolithic, transition problems and hominid species: Greece in broader perspective

J. A. J. Gowlett
British School at Athens Studies
Vol. 3, THE PALAEOLITHIC ARCHAEOLOGY OF GREECE AND ADJACENT AREAS: Proceedings of the ICOPAG Conference, Ioannina, September 1994 (1999), pp. 43-58
Published by: British School at Athens
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40960213
Page Count: 16
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The Lower and Middle Palaeolithic, transition problems and hominid species: Greece in broader perspective
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Abstract

Greece is one of the vital crossroads of the Lower and Middle Palaeolithic Worlds. We now know from sites like Isernia in Italy, Kärlich in Germany and Dmanisi in Georgia, as well as Ubeidiya in Israel, that population movements and cultural information transfer were going on between the Middle East and Eurasia for verging on a million years at least. Greece has fewer documented sites than other regions, but the existence of occasional hand-axes proves human presence in Acheulean times, and the Petralona skull testifies to the presence of archaic Homo sapiens (or Homo heidelbergensis). Thereafter we may suspect continuity of occupation, and, in the Middle Palaeolithic for the first time, we have the opportunity of making detailed comparisons with other areas. Kokkinopilos and Asprochaliko show the existence of a local Middle Palaeolithic in several variants, sequential, geographical or functional. At times it possessed advanced features such as leafpoints, or elongated Levallois flakes. In this paper an effort is made to assess their context, and to make comparisons with the broader picture provided by other areas.

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