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Recording Cyprus's mining history through archaeological survey

Vasiliki Kassianidou
British School at Athens Studies
Vol. 11, ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SURVEY IN CYPRUS: PAST HISTORY, FUTURE POTENTIALS (2004), pp. 95-104
Published by: British School at Athens
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40960376
Page Count: 10
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Recording Cyprus's mining history through archaeological survey
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Abstract

One of the main contributions of the Sydney Cyprus Survey Project was the application of archaeological methods for the systematic recording of metallurgical sites and the inclusion of finds such as slag, furnace fragments and other archaeometallurgical waste in the list of archaeological artefacts recorded by field teams. Hitherto, no other archaeological or even archaeometallurgical survey project undertaken on Cyprus has ever approached the issue of recording ancient mining, metallurgical sites and archaeometallurgical finds in the same manner. The methodology we developed has enabled us to record the mining history of the area not only diachronically but also spatially. In other words, we have been able to record the distribution of the different types of archaeometallurgical sites in the landscape, as well as their relation to other sites such as settlements, where presumably the work force would have lived. Based on these observations we are now in a much better position to seek similar sites in other areas of the Troödos foothills and expand our understanding of the copper industry on which Cyprus's economy was based throughout antiquity.

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