Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Lung cancer and other mortality patterns among foundrymen

Elizabeth Egan-Baum, Barry A Miller and Richard J Waxweiler
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Vol. 7, Supplement 4. Proceedings of the US-Finnish joint symposium on occupational safety and health and the third annual NIOSH scientific symposium (1981), pp. 147-155
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40964864
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($23.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Lung cancer and other mortality patterns among foundrymen
Preview not available

Abstract

This report updates a previous proportional mortality study of deaths among members of the International Molders and Allied Workers Union and includes new findings from a nested case-referent study of lung cancer. Death certificates were obtained for 99.2 % of the 3,013 deaths reported to the Union death benefits program between 1971 and 1975. With the use of age-and race-specific cause distributions of all male deaths in the United States for comparison, statistically significant excesses occurred for all malignant neoplasms, lung cancer, and nonmalignant respiratory disease among both the whites and blacks. White foundrymen also exhibited a statistically significant excess of respiratory tuberculosis. The lung cancer case-referent study found a statistically significant (p < 0.05) odds ratio of 2.36 for workers in iron foundries when compared with workers in steel and nonferrous foundries for those who died before the age of 65. A much smaller odds ratio, 1.19, was found for those who died after the age of 64.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[147]
    [147]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
154
    154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
155
    155