Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Shift work and sick leave

Magnar Kleiven, Henrik Bøggild and Hans J Jeppesen
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Vol. 24, Supplement 3. New challenges for the organization of night and shift work: Proceedings of the XIII International Symposium on Night and Shift Work, 23—27 June 1997, Finland (1998), pp. 128-133
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40966849
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($23.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Shift work and sick leave
Preview not available

Abstract

Objective Shift workers working nights are known to have higher morbidity from certain illnesses than day workers. This study examined episodes of certified sick leaves of day workers and shift workers in a large industrial plant to examine whether slowly rotating shift work leads to increased risk of sick leave. Methods In a case-base design more than 11 000 episodes of sick leave, lasting more than 3 days, were obtained from the sick-leave files of a chemical plant in Norway. The diagnoses were grouped into 5 categories according to information on their work schedules. The workers included in the study were divided into 3 groups. They worked slowly rotating 3 shifts, 2 shifts without night work, and daytime schedules. Results For all the diagnoses the shift workers and day workers were evenly distributed among the cases and the referents, the odds ratios ranging from 0.8 to 1.2. The risk of sick leave did not change with the number of years in shift work. There was a higher risk of sick leave with musculoskeletal diagnoses among the 2-shift workers. Conclusions In this study shift workers did not have a higher risk of sick leave for diseases that, in previous studies, have been shown to be related to shift and night work. Although bias may be present in the study, the results are in line with those of previous studies, and they suggest that even certified sick leaves are not a valid proxy for morbidity.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
128
    128
  • Thumbnail: Page 
129
    129
  • Thumbnail: Page 
130
    130
  • Thumbnail: Page 
131
    131
  • Thumbnail: Page 
132
    132
  • Thumbnail: Page 
133
    133