Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Semen quality and sexual hormones in greenhouse workers

Annette Abell, Erik Ernst and Jens Peter Bonde
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Vol. 26, No. 6 (December 2000), pp. 492-500
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40967097
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Download ($23.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Semen quality and sexual hormones in greenhouse workers
Preview not available

Abstract

Objectives This study focused on determining the testicular function of greenhouse workers exposed to pesticides. Methods Semen was examined for 122 of 199 eligible men (61 %) from 30 ornamental flower greenhouses. Sperm concentration, morphology, and viability were measured according to World Health Organization guidelines, and the curvilinear sperm velocity was determined by a computer-assisted analysis of video recordings. Three groups were formed according to expert judgment of current exposure to pesticides from cultures, pesticide formulations, and the transfer of pesticide residues from leaves to hands, and also ranked according to years of work in a greenhouse. The risk estimates were adjusted for the effects of sexual abstinence and other potentially confounding factors. Results According to current exposure the median values of sperm concentration and the proportion of normal spermatozoa were 60% and 14% lower, respectively, in the high-level exposure group (N= 13) than in the low-level group (N= 44), and the values of the intermediate group fell in between. The adjusted differences between the highlevel and low-level exposure groups were statistically significant, while no differences were observed for the viability and velocity of sperm and sexual hormones. The median sperm concentration was 40% lower for the men with >10 years' experience in a greenhouse than for those with < 5 years' experience. The age-adjusted testosterone/sex-hormone-binding globulin ratio declined 1.9% (95% confidence interval 0.4—3.4%) per year of work. Conclusions The results are compatible with the hypothesis that male fecundity may be at risk from exposure to pesticides in the manual handling of cultures in greenhouses.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
492
    492
  • Thumbnail: Page 
493
    493
  • Thumbnail: Page 
494
    494
  • Thumbnail: Page 
495
    495
  • Thumbnail: Page 
496
    496
  • Thumbnail: Page 
497
    497
  • Thumbnail: Page 
498
    498
  • Thumbnail: Page 
499
    499
  • Thumbnail: Page 
500
    500