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Habitat Utilization by Impala (Aepyceros melampus) in the Okavango Delta

C.M. Bonyongo
Botswana Notes and Records
Vol. 37, Special Edition on Human Interactions and Natural Resource Dynamics in the Okavango Delta and Ngamiland (2005), pp. 227-235
Published by: Botswana Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40980416
Page Count: 9
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Habitat Utilization by Impala (Aepyceros melampus) in the Okavango Delta
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Abstract

This paper presents preliminary results from a long-term study on the ecology of large herbivores in the Okavango Delta. The paper evaluates habitat selection and utilization by impala (Aepyceros melampus) at the various habitat scales. Impala, the most abundant and widely distributed mammal species in the Delta, showed seasonality in habitat use and habitat selection. In all seasons impala used mixed open woodlands more than any other habitat type. Open grasslands and upper floodplains are also key habitats for impala. As a mixed feeder, impala are able to use a wide range of habitats.

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