Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Factors influencing perch selection by communally roosting Turkey Vultures

Betsy A. Evans and Tex A. Sordahl
Journal of Field Ornithology
Vol. 80, No. 4 (DECEMBER 2009), pp. 364-372
Published by: Wiley on behalf of Association of Field Ornithologists
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40983714
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Factors influencing perch selection by communally roosting Turkey Vultures
Preview not available

Abstract

Many birds roost communally during at least part of their annual cycle, suggesting that for them the advantages of living in a group outweigh the disadvantages. However, perch sites within a roost may vary in quality because of differences in degree of exposure to the elements, predators, and fecal droppings. Individuals should select perches in the roost that minimize costs while enabling them to experience the benefits of communal roosting. We studied communally roosting Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura) in northeastern Iowa (USA) from late August to mid-October, when hatching-year (HY) birds had joined the roost and were distinguishable from after-hatching-year (AHY) birds. On 82 d during our 4-yr study (2004-2007), we noted the age class and perch position of vultures on two communication towers used as a preroost site. Perches used by vultures were classified as top-level (with no perches above them) or lower-level (with other perches above them). Top-level perches were preferred by Turkey Vultures. Of 1713 birds recorded, 71% were on top-level perches, even though only 39% of available perches were top-level. Vultures did not use lower perches if top perches on that tower were unoccupied. The percentage of birds using lower perches increased as the number of vultures present increased, suggesting that top-level perches were occupied first. AHY birds used top-level perches more often than expected and HY birds used top-level perches less often than expected, implying that age-related dominance affected perch selection. On 61 of 82 d (74%), top-level perches of both towers were occupied and, on 8 d (10%), only top perches on one tower were occupied. However, on 13 d (16%), both top-level and lower-level perches were occupied on one tower while no vultures perched on the other tower, suggesting that social attraction to other vultures can override a general preference for top-level perches. Thus, our results provide evidence that social attraction, age-related dominance, and preference for higher perches are proximate factors influencing perch selection in communally roosting Turkey Vultures. Ultimate factors that may be responsible for Turkey Vultures preferring higher roosting perches are reduced risk of predation, less exposure to fecal droppings that might reduce their plumage quality, and better visual information for locating food sources. Muchas aves ocupan dormideros comunes durante por lo menos parte de su ciclo anual, cual sugiere que para ellos las ventajas de vivir en grupo son mayores a las desventajas. Sin embargo, los sitios de percha dentro de un dormidero podrían variar en su calidad por las diferencias en el grado en que la percha este expuesto a los elementos, a predadores y a las heces fecales de las aves. Los individuos deberían seleccionar perchas en el dormidero cuales minimizan los costos mientras que les permiten obtener los beneficios de ocupar dormideros comunes. Estudiamos individuos de Cathartes aura que ocupaban dormideros comunes en el noreste de Iowa (EEUU) desde fines de Agosto hasta mediados de Octubre, cuando los individuos en su primer año de edad usaban el dormidero y eran distinguibles de individuos con más de un año de edad. En 82 días durante nuestro estudio de cuatro años (2004-2007), notamos la edad y la posición de la percha de individuos de C. aura en dos torres de comunicación usados por los C. aura antes de entrar al dormidero. Clasificamos las perchas usadas por los C. aura como altas (que no tenían perchas encima), o bajas (que tenían perchas encima). Las perchas altas eran preferidas por los C. aura. De 1713 individuos documentados, el 71% ocupaban perchas altas, aunque solo 39% de las perchas disponibles eran altas. Los C. aura no usaban las perchas bajas si las perchas altas en la misma torre estaban desocupadas. El porcentaje de individuos que usaban perchas bajas incrementaba en cuanto el número de individuos incrementaba, cual sugiere que las perchas altas fueron ocupadas primero. Los individuos con más de un año de edad usaron las perchas altas en una frecuencia mayor a lo esperado, e individuos en su primer año de edad usaron las perchas altas en una frecuencia menor a lo esperado, cual sugiere que la dominancia relacionada con la edad afectaba a la selección de las perchas. Durante 61 cíe los 82 días (74%), las perchas altas en las dos torres fueron ocupadas, y durante ocho días (10%) solo las perchas altas en una torre fueron ocupadas. Sin embargo, durante 13 días (16%), las perchas altas y bajas fueron ocupadas en una torre, mientras que ningún C. aura percho en la otra torre, cual sugiere que la atracción social a otros individuos puede ser más importante que la preferencia general para perchas altas. Entonces, nuestros resultados proveen evidencia que la atracción social, la dominancia relacionada con la edad, y la preferencia para perchas más altas son factores próximos cuales influyen a la selección de perchas en individuos de C. aura cuales usan dormideros comunes. Factores últimos cuales podrían ser responsables para que los C. aura prefieran perchas más altas en el dormidero son un menor riesgo de predación, una menor exposición a las heces fecales de otras aves, cual podría disminuir la calidad de su plumaje, y mejor información visual para identificar donde encontrar comida.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
364
    364
  • Thumbnail: Page 
365
    365
  • Thumbnail: Page 
366
    366
  • Thumbnail: Page 
367
    367
  • Thumbnail: Page 
368
    368
  • Thumbnail: Page 
369
    369
  • Thumbnail: Page 
370
    370
  • Thumbnail: Page 
371
    371
  • Thumbnail: Page 
372
    372