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Doing Anthropology in Sound

Steve Feld and Donald Brenneis
American Ethnologist
Vol. 31, No. 4 (Nov., 2004), pp. 461-474
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the American Anthropological Association
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4098863
Page Count: 14
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Doing Anthropology in Sound
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Abstract

Sound has come to have a particular resonance in many disciplines over the past decade. Social theorists, historians, literary researchers, folklorists, and scholars in science and technology studies and visual, performative, and cultural studies provide a range of substantively rich accounts and epistemologically provocative models for how researchers can take sound seriously. This conversation explores general outlines of an anthropology of sound. Its main focus, however, is on the issues involved in using sound as a primary medium for ethnographic research.

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