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Un ejemplo de las relaciones ciudad-campo: Las Heras y sus vinculaciones con el núcleo de la Aglomeración Mendocina

María Estela F. de Civit, María Josefina G. de Manchón, María Raquel Butera, Silvia Lilia Triolo and Eduardo Emilio Pérez Romagnolli
Revista Geográfica
No. 76 (Junio de 1972), pp. 9-59
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/40992190
Page Count: 54
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Un ejemplo de las relaciones ciudad-campo: Las Heras y sus vinculaciones con el núcleo de la Aglomeración Mendocina
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Abstract

Mendoza is the principal center of the Argentine West. Winegrowing, as the prevailing industry since the turn of the century, has enabled it to hold a privileged position among the cities of the country supported by its commercial and financial function, its cultural activity and its position as an important center of sevices. Located at the foot of the arid Andes, it is affected by earthquakes and summer alluvial flows, the latter more severe in the north of the built-up area: Las Heras. The first thing that attracts attention in this section of Greater Mendoza (Las Heras, Guaymallén, Godoy Cruz, Maipú and Luján) is its peculiar demographic development: it failed to attract European immigration and was therefore deprived of the ensuant impulsion (1869-1914); years later, in exchange, it became the section of the most vigorous growth on account of internal migration (rural exodus). The second salient fact is to be found spatially in the competition for land between the pre-existing agricultural structure and advancing urban occupation. Thus, stresses have originated between town and country and new urban sections have emerged, generally unplanned, and lacking the indispensable services, including water. On the basis of this element these sections have been classified in three categories. In relation to the water supply, there is a certain formal and social coincidence, and the overlying trait, with only slight shades of difference, is poverty. Poverty and stagnation, have laid their imprint on the center of Las Heras despite the vivacity of the populace thronging the streets at every hour of the day. The decline derives from a series of factors unfavorable conditions of location, the cemetery of the state capital, population trends of its own, proximity to the nucleus of the built-up area. . . Such deficiencies explain the lack of connection between the three spatial sectors, rural, urban and industrial, that go to form this Lasherian reality. El Algarrobal, the only township in the area studied, is inserted into the predominant farming zone, but fails to perform fully the functions of service center owing to a lack of equipment. This would seem to sum up all the problems of Las Heras.

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