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"HAMDAN V. RUMSFELD": THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION AND 'THE RULE OF LAW'

DENNIS PHILLIPS
Australasian Journal of American Studies
Vol. 25, No. 2 (December 2006), pp. 40-52
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41054023
Page Count: 13
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"HAMDAN V. RUMSFELD": THE BUSH ADMINISTRATION AND 'THE RULE OF LAW'
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Abstract

In June 2006 the US Supreme Court announced its decision in Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, the Court's most notable case in its 2005-2006 Session. Widely hailed as a check on presidential power with regard to the treatment of Guantanamo Bay detainees, Hamdan was in fact a restrained, primarily procedural decision that represented no real threat to presidential authority. George W. Bush went to work immediately to transform what many took to be a judicial roadblock into apolitical advantage aimed at the further expansion of executive power.

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