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THE PLEASURES OF INFLUENCE. INTERTEXTUALITY IN "MULLIGAN STEW" (1979) BY GILBERT SORRENTINO

Luc Herman
Atlantis
Vol. 20, No. 1 (Junio 1998), pp. 59-66
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41055490
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
THE PLEASURES OF INFLUENCE. INTERTEXTUALITY IN "MULLIGAN STEW" (1979) BY GILBERT SORRENTINO
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Abstract

This article analyses the extreme intertextuality displayed in Mulligan Stew (1979) by the American novelist Gilbert Sorrentino. Building on a sensible taxonomy of intertextuality offered by Broich and Pfister (1985), the analysis of the novel first of all attempts to grasp the impressive range with which Sorrentino borrows from or evokes existing texts and genres. Secondly, the article argues that Sorrentino deals with those existing genres and texts in an effort to show his own mastery and thus to establish his artistic identity. Instead of resorting to intertextuality because there is nothing else left to do, he turns the weight of tradition into a source of aesthetic pleasure as a proof of his own virtuosity as a writer. «mulligan stew n -s (prob. fr. the name Mulligan): a stew of vegetables, meat or fish, and other available foodstuffs» (Webster's Third New International Dictionary) «— Seymour's back in town, the young man said, grasping again his spur of rock. Chucked medicine and going in for the army. — Ah, go to God, Buck Mulligan said. — Going over next week to stew » (James Joyce, Ulysses)

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