Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Structural Implications of System Size: Evidence from a Developing Country

Jay D. Teachman
The Sociological Quarterly
Vol. 21, No. 3 (Summer, 1980), pp. 307-320
Published by: Wiley on behalf of the Midwest Sociological Society
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4106295
Page Count: 14
  • Download ($14.00)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
The Structural Implications of System Size: Evidence from a Developing Country
Preview not available

Abstract

Previous research has found considerable evidence that system size is directly related to a variety of system structures. Most notably, perhaps, has been the effort to link system size to changes in industrial and occupational specialization (i.e., greater concentration of personnel engaged in transportation and communication with increases in system size). Most such research has been carried out in the context of formal organizations, or urban industrial environments. Results presented in this paper indicate that in at least one less developed country there is little or no task specialization as system size increases on at least one level of systems. The implication is that the formal, rational nature of previous samples may have influenced the strong relationship heretofore found between system size and task specialization.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[307]
    [307]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
308
    308
  • Thumbnail: Page 
309
    309
  • Thumbnail: Page 
310
    310
  • Thumbnail: Page 
311
    311
  • Thumbnail: Page 
312
    312
  • Thumbnail: Page 
313
    313
  • Thumbnail: Page 
314
    314
  • Thumbnail: Page 
315
    315
  • Thumbnail: Page 
316
    316
  • Thumbnail: Page 
317
    317
  • Thumbnail: Page 
318
    318
  • Thumbnail: Page 
319
    319
  • Thumbnail: Page 
320
    320