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The Genus Concept in Practice: But for What Practice?

P. F. Stevens
Kew Bulletin
Vol. 40, No. 3 (1985), pp. 457-465
Published by: Springer on behalf of Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew
DOI: 10.2307/4109605
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4109605
Page Count: 9
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The Genus Concept in Practice: But for What Practice?
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Abstract

Problems with classifications that attempt to serve multiple purposes and which are formed by methodologies which conflict with evolutionary thought are discussed. Multiple- or general-purpose classifications are inherently unsuitable for dealing with particular problems since such classifications are optimal for no one problem and the goals of the user will conflict with the constraints of the classification. The value of having a classification that attempts to be congruent with our best estimate of phylogeny is stressed.

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