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Vowel Nasality as a Distinctive Feature in American English

André Malécot
Language
Vol. 36, No. 2, Part 1 (Apr. - Jun., 1960), pp. 222-229
DOI: 10.2307/410987
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/410987
Page Count: 8
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Vowel Nasality as a Distinctive Feature in American English
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Abstract

Vowel nasality is a distinctive feature in American English in cases such as camp, hint, and bunk, as compared, respectively, with cap, hit, and buck. This is demonstrated by the results of a number of experiments with synthetic speech and magnetic tape, by data obtained from spectrograms and kymograms, and by the descriptive analysis of pertinent utterances by American speakers. A general rule for the distribution of this phenomenon is given in the conclusion.

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