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A Practical Guide to Planning and Conducting an Interdisciplinary Archaeological Research Project: Lessons Learned from SCAPE

Garry L. Running IV, B.A. Nicholson, Matthew Boyd, Dion Wiseman and Sylvia Nicholson
Canadian Journal of Archaeology / Journal Canadien d'Archéologie
Vol. 31, No. 3, Supplement: Building a Contextual Milieu: Interdisciplinary Modeling and Theoretical Perspectives from the SCAPE Project (2007), pp. 48-64
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41103591
Page Count: 17
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
A Practical Guide to Planning and Conducting an Interdisciplinary Archaeological Research Project: Lessons Learned from SCAPE
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Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to share some practical tips and lessons learned during the course of SCAPE (Study of Cultural Adaptations within the Prairies Ecozone) with researchers interested in organizing or participating in a large-scale interdisciplinary archaeological project. Archaeologists, Earth scientists, and paleoecologists were involved in SCAPE from its inception. Interdisciplinary communication proved a key element to success of the project. Even when participating researchers come from home disciplines considered to be "inherently interdisciplinary" developing such communication was not a simple matter. Many beneficial mechanisms were developed for fostering such communication. Meeting together frequently, attending conferences as a group, and living and working together in the field proved particularly helpful. Unifying systems were developed for: collecting spatial data, archiving and cataloguing disparate data-sets in a GIS, sharing these data amongst participating researchers during the project, and managing analyses of all data collected in the field. Le but de cet article est de partager quelques leçons pratiques apprises durant le projet SCAPE (Study of Cultural Adaptations within the Prairies Ecozone ou Étude des adaptations culturelles dans les éco-zones des Prairies) avec des chercheurs intéressés à organiser ou à participer dans un projet archéologique interdisciplinaire à grande échelle. Des spécialistes en archéologie, les sciences de la terre, et paléoécologie ont été intégrés dans SCAPE depuis son début. La communication interdisciplinaire s'est révélé être un élément principal pour le succès du projet. Bien que les chercheurs participants proviennent de disciplines considérées comme « interdisciplinaires », une communication interdisciplinaire n'a pas toujours été chose facile. Beaucoup de mécanismes ont été développés pour stimuler une telle communication. Des réunions fréquentes, assister à des colloques en tant que groupe, et vivre et travailler ensemble sur le terrain se sont révélés particulièrement utiles. Des systèmes intégrés ont été développés pour: rassembler les données spatiales, archiver et cataloguer des données disparates dans un SIG, partager ces données parmi les chercheurs durant le projet, et gérer toutes les données rassemblées sur le terrain.

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