Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

How the size of a coalition affects its chances to influence an election

Arkadii Slinko
Social Choice and Welfare
Vol. 26, No. 1 (January 2006), pp. 143-153
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41106725
Page Count: 11
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
How the size of a coalition affects its chances to influence an election
Preview not available

Abstract

Since voting rules are prototypes for many aggregation procedures, they also illuminate problems faced by economics and decision sciences. In this paper we are trying to answer the question: How large should a coalition be to have a chance to influence an election? We answer this question for all scoring rules and multistage elimination rules, under the Impartial Anonymous Culture assumption. We show that, when the number of participating agents n tends to infinity, the ratio of voting situations that can be influenced by a coalition of voters to all voting situations is no greater than $D_m \frac{k}{n}$;, where Dm is a constant which depends only on the number m of alternatives but not on and n. Recent results on individual manipulability in three alternative elections show that this estimate is exact for k=1 and m=3.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[143]
    [143]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
144
    144
  • Thumbnail: Page 
145
    145
  • Thumbnail: Page 
146
    146
  • Thumbnail: Page 
147
    147
  • Thumbnail: Page 
148
    148
  • Thumbnail: Page 
149
    149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
150
    150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
151
    151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
152
    152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
153
    153