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Educational Expansion and Educational Reproduction in Eastern Europe, 1940-1979

PAUL NIEUWBEERTA and SUSANNE RIJKEN
Czech Sociological Review
Vol. 4, No. 2, Sociology and Historical Change: The Case of the Post-Communist Transformation in Europe (FALL 1996), pp. 187-210
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41133015
Page Count: 24
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Educational Expansion and Educational Reproduction in Eastern Europe, 1940-1979
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Abstract

This paper considers changes in the effects of parental background on educational attainment in five Eastern European nations (Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia) over the 1940-1979 period. Data of male respondents (N = 13,997) from Treiman and Szeleny's 'Social Stratification in Eastern European' surveys held in these countries are analysed. The paper shows slight but consistent decreases in the effects of parents' education, status and political partymembership on final educational attainment (measured in years of schooling). On the other hand, it demonstrates stability or increases in the effects of parental background on the continuation probabilities at schooling transitions. Applying a method developed by Mare (ASR 1981), the paper reveals that the slight decreases in the effects of parental background on final educational attainment result from two offsetting influences. Stability or slight increases in the effects of parental background on school continuation probabilities in schooling transitions resulted in the stability of increase in these effects, whereas the substantial educational expansion that occurred in these nations resulted in their decrease.

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