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The Czech Transformation – The Universal and the Particular

MILOŠ HAVELKA and Alexandra J. Kirilčuková
Czech Sociological Review
Vol. 5, No. 1 (SPRING 1997), pp. 73-78
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41133027
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Czech Transformation – The Universal and the Particular
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Abstract

In the economic, political and social transformation of the postcommunist countries of East-Central Europe some groups of values are asserting themselves. These are different in themselves and in the degree of their universal validity, and on the other hand they are connected with the specificity of the historical processes pertaining to these countries. Universal values and general civilisational characteristics and their historical continuity create the main feature of western society, and at the same time, the general modernisational goal of the directing of the transformation. In opposition to this are the subjective projects and illusions of individuals and groups concerning the possibilities of the transformation, especially those formed in political movements after the revolution of 1989, and these have the quality of being particular and discontinuous. General post-revolution democratic, liberalisation, and privatisation changes represent a separation with the past, but are at the same time interconnected with it. This group of values including the inherited mentality, and the cultural and social capitals of the past (the so-called politics of national interest), intervene in a determining way in the character of the changes and in creating universal institutions and individualisation processes of transition.

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