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Post-Positivist Social Geography

E. Jones
GeoJournal
Vol. 9, No. 3, Social Geography (November 1984), pp. 241-245
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41143376
Page Count: 5
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Post-Positivist Social Geography
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Abstract

Although positivist methodology has been used so extensively in social geography, it is now widely recognized that it is inadequate for describing and understanding social processes as a whole because it eschews cultural values. The behavioural reaction recognized this but still used positivist methodology. Methods may reflect scale, a macro-approach demanding a positivist approach, a micro analysis being more qualitative. Applying both to problems of assimilation in an American ethnic group revealed different processes, both necessary for a full understanding. Aggregate methods and generalized models of man go part of the way only. The quantitative/macro approach must be supplemented by the qualitative/micro. A further departure has been a recognition that social geographers must look at society's needs. Involvement in social processes and policy making is accepted by most. Whether the answer is interpreted by a liberal/consensus approach, or by a radical/revolutionary, is for the individual to decide. Finally, as geographers, social geographers cannot ignore the significance of place and region, whose specificity is sometimes critical in our perception of problems and answers.

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