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Some Reasons Why There Can't Be Any Some-Any Rule

Robin Lakoff
Language
Vol. 45, No. 3 (Sep., 1969), pp. 608-615
DOI: 10.2307/411442
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/411442
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Some Reasons Why There Can't Be Any Some-Any Rule
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Abstract

This paper presents evidence that semantic notions-such as presupposition, speaker's and hearer's beliefs about the world, and previous discourse-must be taken into account in a complete treatment of the distribution of some and any in conditional, negative, and interrogative sentences. Syntactic conditions alone will not account for the fact that, in certain sentence types, the two forms occur with different meanings.

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