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Arctic Worlds and the Geography of Imagination

Nancy C. Doubleday
GeoJournal
Vol. 26, No. 2, History of Geographical Thought (February 1992), pp. 211-215
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41145357
Page Count: 5
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Arctic Worlds and the Geography of Imagination
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Abstract

The intent of this paper is to contribute to a larger discussion of the history of geographical thought and its consequences by gently drawing attention to the Arctic as a place where alternative visions of nature, home and horizon persist; by contrasting many of our unchallenged geographical assumptions with what might be the logical consequence had we started in a different place, under different conditions and with a different perspective. It is never easy to comprehend the perspective of another and it is unwise to presume that one has indeed done so. For this reason, while this paper explores the dichotomy between the geographic perspectives of the Arctic, particularly those of the Inuit who know it best, and those of the Western Europeans who have literally laid claim to the Arctic geography, it does not purport to be anthropological or ethnographical. Rather it is an attempt to sketch the intellectual landscapes implicit in the contrast between Inuit and European approaches to the Arctic.

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