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The Historical Origins of Afrocentrism

Mia Bay
Amerikastudien / American Studies
Vol. 45, No. 4, Time and the African-American Experience (2000), pp. 501-512
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41157604
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Historical Origins of Afrocentrism
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Abstract

This paper explores the historical origins of Afrocentric thought. A set of ideas celebrating the African origins, history and character of black people, Afrocentrism is sometimes seen as a long-standing tradition in black thought. This paper argues that Afrocentrism is a relatively recent invention, and must be seen as the product of a specific historical and cultural context. Inspired by the cultural nationalist movement of the late 1970s, Afrocentrism is a modern phenomenon that can and should be distinguished from earlier variants of black cultural nationalism.

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