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Substancia do claro em João Cabral de Melo Neto

Regina Celia Colonia
Mediterranean Studies
Vol. 1, Iberia & the Mediterranean (1989), pp. 271-283
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41166803
Page Count: 13
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Substancia do claro em João Cabral de Melo Neto
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Abstract

The diurnal regimen of the image can be defined as the regimen of the antithesis. Those who studied the works of the so called "poets of the light" point out, among other characteristics, the double polarization in the images of Victor Hugo, the dualism of the metaphors of day and night in the troubadour's saga, in the mystical sufist poets, in the "roman breton," in the poetry of Saint John of the Cross, in Valery, etc. To broach what I call the substance of clarity in the poetry of João Cabrai de Melo Neto, taking as a starting point a reading of the anthropological structures of the imagery in the works of this outstanding Brazilian contemporary poet, I comment about some of his poems and I attempt to indicate solar characteristics which unite his personal journey to the roots of Mediterranean culture. João Cabrai de Melo Neto was born in Recife, on January 9th, 1920, of old, traditional families of the states of Pernambuco and Paraiba. A Diplomat, now a retired Ambassador, he served in Barcelona, London, Seville, Marseille, Madrid, Geneva, Dakar, Quito, Tegucigalpa and Porto. Sharp and precise as "a knife all blade" (to quote the title of one of his books), his social and metapoetical poetry evolves in a copious bibliography: A Educação pela Pedra, Serial, Dois Parlamentos, Quaderna, Urna Faca So Lamina, the internationally known and applauded Morte e Vida Severina, Paisagem com Figuras, O Rio, O Cão sent Plumas, Psicologia da Composição, O Engenheiro, Os Tres Mal-Amados, Pedra do Sonó, Museu de ludo, Agrestes, etc.

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