Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access JSTOR through your library or other institution:

login

Log in through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Journal Article

Ethnic Networks, Information, and International Trade: Revisiting the Evidence

Gabriel J. Felbermayr, Benjamin Jung and Farid Toubal
Annals of Economics and Statistics
No. 97/98, MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT (JANUARY/JUNE 2010), pp. 41-70
Published by: GENES on behalf of ADRES
DOI: 10.2307/41219109
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41219109
Page Count: 30
Were these topics helpful?
See something inaccurate? Let us know!

Select the topics that are inaccurate.

  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Add to My Lists
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ethnic Networks, Information, and International Trade:
                            Revisiting the Evidence
Preview not available

Abstract

Co-ethnic networks foster trade by providing information about trading opportunities and taking advantage of mutual trust. While the economics literature usually focuses on direct ethnic links between source and host countries, sociological studies adopt a broader perspective. They emphasize the role of ethnic minorities as middlemen who organize trade between various regions in the world. Rauch and Trindade [2002] study those indirect links between ethnic Chinese in different host countries. We revisit their work, particularly focusing on the trade-cost channel. Moreover, we extend the analysis to all potential ethnic networks. Using new data on bilateral stocks of migrants from the World Bank for the year of 2000, we find that the trade creating potential of the Chinese network is dwarfed by other ethnic networks, e. g., the Polish, the Turkish, the Mexican, or the Pakistani networks. The large heterogeneity in the pro-trade effect of different networks is, among other things, explained by the share of high-skilled immigrants, the degree of ethnic fragmentation, and GDP per capita. Les réseaux ethniques favorisent le commerce en informant sur les débouchés commerciaux et en se basant sur la confiance réciproque. Bien que la littérature économique se concentre habituellement sur les liens ethniques directs entre pays d'origine et d'accueil, les études sociologiques adoptent une perspective plus large. Elles soulignent le rôle des minorités ethniques comme intermédiaires dans l'organisation des échanges entre les différentes régions du monde. Rauch et Trindade (2002) étudient ces liens indirects entre les groupes ethniques chinois dans différents pays d'accueil. Nous revisitons leur travail, en se concentrant notamment sur le canal des coûts de commerce. En outre, nous étendons leur analyse à tous les réseaux ethniques possibles. En utilisant de nouvelles données sur les stocks bilatéraux de migrants en provenance de la Banque mondiale pour l'année 2000, nous constatons que le potentiel de création de commerce du réseau chinois est éclipsé par d'autres réseaux ethniques, tels que le réseau polonais, le réseau turc, le réseau mexicain, ou le réseau pakistanais. L'hétérogénéité dans les effets des différents réseaux ethniques sur le commerce est, entre autres, expliquée par la proportion d'immigrants hautement qualifiés, le degré de fragmentation ethnique, et le PIB par habitant.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
41
    41
  • Thumbnail: Page 
42
    42
  • Thumbnail: Page 
43
    43
  • Thumbnail: Page 
44
    44
  • Thumbnail: Page 
45
    45
  • Thumbnail: Page 
46
    46
  • Thumbnail: Page 
47
    47
  • Thumbnail: Page 
48
    48
  • Thumbnail: Page 
49
    49
  • Thumbnail: Page 
50
    50
  • Thumbnail: Page 
51
    51
  • Thumbnail: Page 
52
    52
  • Thumbnail: Page 
53
    53
  • Thumbnail: Page 
54
    54
  • Thumbnail: Page 
55
    55
  • Thumbnail: Page 
56
    56
  • Thumbnail: Page 
57
    57
  • Thumbnail: Page 
58
    58
  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70