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Migration and Human Capital in an Endogenous Fertility Model

Luca Marchiori, Patrice Pieretti and Benteng Zou
Annals of Economics and Statistics
No. 97/98, MIGRATION AND DEVELOPMENT (JANUARY/JUNE 2010), pp. 187-205
Published by: GENES on behalf of ADRES
DOI: 10.2307/41219115
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41219115
Page Count: 19
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Migration and Human Capital in an Endogenous Fertility
                            Model
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Abstract

What is the impact of high-skilled emigration on fertility and human capital in migrants' origin countries? This question is analyzed within an overlapping generations model where parents choose to finance higher education for a certain number of their children. It follows that families are composed of high-and low-skilled children who may both emigrate with a certain probability when they reach adulthood. It is found that a brain drain leads to a change in children's skill composition, with parents choosing to provide higher education to a larger number of their children. A calibration of the model suggests that, following a brain drain, the additional children benefiting from higher education might in the long run compensate for the loss of high-educated workers and lead to a brain gain. Quel est l'impact de la migration des plus qualifiés sur la fertilité et la formation de capital humain dans les pays d'origine. Nous étudions cette question à l'aide d'une modèle à générations imbriquées où les parents décident du financement de l'éducation d'une partie de leurs enfants. Les familles mêlent alors des enfants non qualifiés et des enfants qualifiés, tous étant susceptibles d'émigrer avec une certaine probabilité à l'âge adulte. On montre que la fuite des cerveaux modifie la structure de qualification de la famille, les parents choisissant de fournir une éducation supérieure à plus d'enfants. Après calibration, le modèle suggère que les pertes induites par la fuite des cerveaux sont, à long terme, plus que compensées par les enfants supplémentaires qui sont formés.

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