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The De Militari Scientia or Müller Fragment as a philological resource. Latin in the East Roman army and two new loanwords in Greek: palmarium and *recala

Philip Rance
Glotta
Bd. 86 (2010), pp. 63-92
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41219881
Page Count: 30
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The De Militari Scientia or Müller Fragment as a philological resource. Latin in the East Roman army and two new loanwords in Greek: palmarium and *recala
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Abstract

The continued use of Latin as the official Heeressprache of the East Roman Empire up to the 630s supplies the context for an examination of a text virtually unknown to classical scholarship. Mediceo-Laurentianus graecus LV-4 contains an anonymous and mutilated Greek military treatise, published by Karl Müller in 1880 and subsequently styled De Militari Scientia. Its character, date and textual affinities are briefly considered, concluding that it is an informal epitome or 'working copy' of Maurice's Strategicon (ca.590s), possibly compiled ca. 630s-640s as an aide-mémoire for a senior officer. This treatise is a unique witness to two loanwords from Latin – παλμάριον (palmarium) and ṕέκαλα (*recala), neither previously documented in léxica, and the latter not directly attested in Latin. The author's usage of the construction ṕέκαλα δίδωμι / ṕέκαλα ποιέω, with the sense 'to make a withdrawal', now permits recognition of the corresponding expression recala facio in the highly corrupted text of a Latin speech preserved in the Strategicon.

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