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Derniers résultats, nouvelles datations et nouvelles données sur les fortifications de Shabwa (Ḥaḍramawt) Latest results, new dating, and recent evidence for the fortifications of Shabwa (Ḥaḍramawt)

Christian Darles
Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies
Vol. 38, Papers from the forty-first meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held in London, 19-21 July 2007 (2008), pp. 141-151
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41223945
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Derniers résultats, nouvelles datations et nouvelles données sur les fortifications de Shabwa (Ḥaḍramawt) Latest results, new dating, and recent evidence for the fortifications of Shabwa (Ḥaḍramawt)
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Abstract

The research undertaken since 2002 on the urbanism and fortifications of Shabwa allows a better understanding of the relationships between the occupation of the town, the domestic architecture and the three lines of curtain walls. The first curtain enclosed the intra-muros town with its high-status buildings and was originally constructed on a flat site. The area measuring 15.5 ha is enclosed by a wall 1.6 km long. The most ancient inscription found in the curtain wall, Sh VI/76/89, dates from the seventh century the seventh to the sixth century this wall enclosed pre-existing and independent fortified structures, which were grouped together since the second millennium Dating shows that mortar was present before the fourth century in temple 44, and they are also in the wall foundations near gate no. 6 with a 14 C date of the fourth century The wall then later expanded to include an important extra-mural building under the later royal palace, this latter only acquiring its status once it became part of the town. The second lies within the line of the first. Its over-large wall circuits measuring 3535 m were difficult to defend and do not seem to have been designed to counter a specific threat, but rather to repel brigands and nomads. Thus this line protected herds and caravans within an area measuring 53.9 ha and 2.6 km of perimeter. Later still, the citadel, which had hitherto been independent, became part of a third circuit which extended up the valley to the south. This new area, measuring 3.7 ha, is enclosed by a wall 850 m long.

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