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Les cadres de l'enseignement dans les Etats de la communauté francophone / TEACHERS' TRAINING IN THE NEW STATES OF THE FRANCO-AFRICAN COMMUNITY

Stéphane HESSEL
Civilisations
Vol. 10, No. 3 (1960), pp. 307-314
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41230693
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Les cadres de l'enseignement dans les Etats de la communauté francophone / TEACHERS' TRAINING IN THE NEW STATES OF THE FRANCO-AFRICAN COMMUNITY
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Abstract

Africanization of staff in the new States of the Franco-African Community requires the extension of education programmes, within the limits of economic development plans. In most of these States, children of school age made up 18 to 20 % of the total population in 1958 ; of this percentage, the proportion of those attending school varied between 4 % in Niger and 72 % in the Congo Republic. Priority is being given nearly everywhere to the recruitment and training of teachers for the primary schools. Teachers form an important part of the intellectual élite ; this implies that a great number of them will eventually leave teaching and take up political and administrative activities. On the other hand, there is either a lack of teachers schools or a lack of people sufficiently educated to benefit from professional training in teachers schools. In order to solve these problems, accelerated training courses are provided, as well as special courses for existing teachers, with a view to forming a group of efficient teaching consultants. Educational systems are based on the French pattern, with a number of minor modifications. Private schools receive grants from the State. Because teaching personnel is so scarce, the lowest primary classes are mostly entrusted to teachers who have gone no further than the certificat d'études which marks the end of the primary stage. Teachers in the higher primary grades have usually obtained their brevet d'études and have undergone one year of professional training similar to that provided in teachers schools. In the Central African Republic, the Government aims at providing primary schools in the main villages and secondary education in the main towns, with one year of professional training for future teachers; it is trying to promote women's education by increasing the number of woman teachers (at present, only about 14 % of the girls attend school). In order to hasten the Africanization process, the young Republic has opened up a Centre for Administrative and Technical Studies in Brazzaville ; the Department of Education of this Centre provides a two-year course open to students having obtained their brevet d'études and preparing them to give the special courses for existing teachers. The Centre also hopes to increase the number of those holding baccalauréat degrees so that they may eventually take up at least the first few grades of the secondary schools. But for the next ten years and in most of the new Franco-African States, secondary teachers will have to be provided — and paid for — by France under technical assistance schemes. In the field of education, technical assistance is provided by France under three main forms : — civil servants or experts are supplied ; — students are sent to French Universities and higher schools ; — training is provided for African teachers, lecturers for the special teachers courses, inspectors, administrative personnel, camp monitors, teachers of gymnastics, etc. at the Ecole Normale de Saint-Cloud and at the Ecole Normale d'Auteuil. Every year, 80 African men and women teachers of primary schools attend an information session held at the International Centre for Pedagogical Studies at Sèvres. In future, special one or two-month courses may even be provided in all these Schools for pupils who have obtained neither the brevet élémentaire nor the brevet d'études du 1er cycle. A finishing course on problems of education planning is to be held in Paris at the end of I960.

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