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Floral Development and Molecular Phylogeny Support the Generic Status of Tasmannia (Winteraceae)

Andrew N. Doust and Andrew N. Drinnan
American Journal of Botany
Vol. 91, No. 3 (Mar., 2004), pp. 321-331
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4123729
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Floral Development and Molecular Phylogeny Support the Generic Status of Tasmannia (Winteraceae)
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Abstract

The taxonomic status of and evolutionary relationship between Tasmannia and Drimys (Winteraceae) have been subjects of controversy for many years. In this paper, a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the family with sequences of previously unpublished Tasmannia and Drimys species confirms earlier conclusions that Tasmannia and Drimys do not form a monophyletic group, despite the fact that they appear to share distinctive inflorescence and floral morphological attributes. Examination of alternative hypotheses of relationships with likelihood-ratio tests and parametric bootstrapping supports the separation of Tasmannia and Drimys. A detailed analysis of floral development in Tasmannia lanceolata and T. xerophila indicates that timing and position of sepal initiation differs between them, but that the position of subsequent organ initiation predictably follows from sepal position. This is in contrast to Drimys winteri, where a prolonged delay between sepal and petal initiation leads to the production of many phyllotactic patterns. The prolonged period of calyx tube growth leading to the formation of a calyptra in Tasmannia and Drimys probably evolved in parallel in the two lineages.

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