Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Drivers of bacterial β-diversity depend on spatial scale

Jennifer B. H. Martiny, Jonathan A. Eisen, Kevin Penn, Steven D. Allison, M. Claire Horner-Devine and Edward F. DeLong
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 108, No. 19 (May 10, 2011), pp. 7850-7854
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41242275
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Drivers of bacterial β-diversity depend on spatial scale
Preview not available

Abstract

The factors driving β-diversity (variation in community composition) yield insights into the maintenance of biodiversity on the planet. Here we tested whether the mechanisms that underlie bacterial β-diversity vary over centimeters to continental spatial scales by comparing the composition of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria communities in salt marsh sediments. As observed in studies of macroorganisms, the drivers of salt marsh bacterial β-diversity depend on spatial scale. In contrast to macroorganism studies, however, we found no evidence of evolutionary diversification of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria taxa at the continental scale, despite an overall relationship between geographic distance and community similarity. Our data are consistent with the idea that dispersal limitation at local scales can contribute to β-diversity, even though the 16S rRNA genes of the relatively common taxa are globally distributed. These results highlight the importance of considering multiple spatial scales for understanding microbial biogeography.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[7850]
    [7850]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7851
    7851
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7852
    7852
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7853
    7853
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7854
    7854